Name Change Filing Fees

State Filing Fee
AK$150
AL$10 - $80
AR$140
AZ$230 - $310
CA$435
CO$83
CT$150
DC$60
DE$85
FL$400
GA$200 - $215
HI$50
IA$180
ID$88
IL$100 - $300
IN$100 - $200
KS$166
KY$50 - $100
LA$400 - $500
MA$165
MD$145
ME$25 - $60
MI$150
MN$200 - $320
MO$100 - $200
MS$100
MT$120
NC$80 - $120
ND$80
NE$83
NH$90
NJ$200
NM$130
NV$100 - $200
NY$65 - $300
OH$100 - $200
OK$165
OR$100 - $200
PA$97 - $330
RI$86
SC$150
SD$70
TN$160
TX$200 - $250
UT$155 - $360
VA$35 - $50
VT$150
WA$120 - $250
WI$165
WV$145
WY$70

When you file for a name change, you are legally asking the court to change the name you were given at birth, adoption, marriage or even after a divorce. Parents may also file for a name change for their minor child. The name change process starts with filing a petition with the court in the county where you reside, and paying the filing fee. Filing fees vary between states, and even counties.

Why do the name change fees vary so much?

Name changes are filed in the county where the person resides. Therefore, each county has the ability to decide what fees are appropriate to that specific court. All fees listed in the chart reflect what is typical in each state, but you may find that your county's fees may differ.

Name Change Filing Fee Waivers

If you think you might not be able to afford to pay the filing fees, you may be able to have them waived. Fee waivers are typicall referred to as an "IFP" ("In Forma Pauperis"). Anyone is entitled to request a fee waiver from the court, but typcially your fee waiver will be granted only if one of the two conditions apply:

  • You are currently eligible for government assistance, or
  • Your household income is 125% or less than the current poverty level as established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
    Note that there are three poverty level charts: one for Alaska, one for Hawaii and one for the remaining 48 states and Washington D.C.

If neither of the above conditions apply, then the court may request you prove that paying the filing fee would result in a substantial hardship due to your current financial situation. Depending on the state and judge, you will be asked to provide documentation of your income (such as paystubs).